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How to Apply for the BCBA® and BCaBA® Exams: A Task Analysis

How to Apply for the BCBA® and BCaBA® Exams: A Task Analysis

Hi ReadySetABA community! Applying for the exam can be confusing and even daunting at times, but look no further! We’ve created a task analysis that hopefully will make this easier. Assuming that you have finished your educational program, and your supervision hours (woohoo!), follow the steps below to sign up for the big exam! 

Task Analysis: How to Apply for the BCBA® and BCaBA® Exams

  1. Go to The BACB website
  2. Click on “My Account” in the top right corner of the screen.
  3. Enter in your email address and password.
  4. Click “log in”.
  5. Click on the “Certification Applications” tab.
  6. Enter in your contact information and click “continue”.
  7. Read over the “Information Release” and choose your option. Click continue.
  8. Enter in your “Personal Information”. Click continue.
  9. Enter in any “Other Professional Credentials” that you may have, or click “none”. Click continue. Complete this step for “Membership in Professional Organizations” as well.
  10. Enter in your “Degree Information”. Click continue.
  11. Enter in your “Training Type”, then click continue.
  12. If you selected coursework in step 11, enter in your coursework information. Click continue.
  13. Next you will add your experience hours on the “Experience Summary” page. You will be prompted to enter in “Experience Details”, including the starting month and year and your supervisor’s information. Click continue.
  14. Read over the “Exam Disability Accommodations”. Select “yes” or “no”, then click “continue”.
  15. Read each “Eligibility Affidavit” question and select “yes” or “no” accordingly. Click “continue”.
  16. Read each of the “Certification Processing Agreement” statements and select “yes” or “no”. Click “continue”.
  17. Review your application in its entirety from the “Application Summary” page.
  18. Click “checkout”.
  19. Enter in your payment information, click “Pay”.

Next, you will wait for the BACB to email you saying that you were approved. If you need any additional documentation, you will be notified. From there, you will receive a link from Pearson Vue testing center with a registration link.

Pat yourselves on the back, you made it this far!

Cheers,

RSABA Team

 

 

Behavior Goes Where Reinforcement Flows

Behavior Goes Where Reinforcement Flows

Say, what?

Pairing… We talk about it often in the field of Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA). We always advise you to pair before placing demands, to pair yourself with things that your scholar likes, and to pair yourself with the families and caregivers that you may be in contact with.

So, what is pairing?

The pairing process consists of repeatedly presenting a neutral stimulus with a conditioned or unconditioned stimulus. After repeated presentations, or pairings, the neutral stimulus will “take on” the properties of the stimulus in which it has been repeatedly paired with. So what does this mean for us as students and practitioners? This means that if our scholar LOVES playdoh, we better repeatedly present ourselves with that playdoh so that we may take on the reinforcing properties of that playdoh for that learner. 

Breakups, Perfume, and Playdoh, oh my!

This seems pretty straight forward while we have on our practitioner hats right? First, pair with the scholar, then begin placing demands and then continue to pair yourself with all the reinforcement.

What does pairing look like in our lives outside of work?

It looks like never going to that restaurant again because you’ve paired it with a bad breakup. It looks like spraying your pillow with your significant other’s scent when you miss them. Without us realizing it, we pair ourselves and other people and things with stimuli around us ALL THE TIME!

The key with pairing that we all must be mindful of, both in our work settings and lives outside of work, is that we can pair ourselves with stimuli that others don’t like. Remember that restaurant I mentioned with the breakup history? Or even think about that playdoh. What if your scholar hated playdoh and every time you saw them, you brought them playdoh to play with? We can all think of that one person that we just love to see go away! That is because they have been paired with something that may be aversive or at the very least displeasing to us.

Take a moment and think to yourself about what you may be paired with for each of the people that you come in contact with each day. Think of your scholars/clients, your spouse, your supervisor. Now think of one thing that you would like to be paired with. Go ahead and target that this upcoming week. Good luck! Tell us how you did below!

Happy pairing,

Cammie

 

What is a BCBA® Anyways?

What is a BCBA® Anyways?

What is a BCBA® Anyways?

A BCBA® is a Board Certified Behavior Analyst. Behavior analysts are behavioral scientists who specialize in manipulating the environment to create the appropriate behavior change that we want to see for our clients using the principles of Applied Behavior Analysis. 

What Can I Do as a BCBA®?

Simply put, anything! Anything involving behavior that is. Most often, BCBAs are known to work with people with special needs, in particular, individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), but the possibilities are endless for behavior analysts. Human Resources, animal training, sports training, school consulting, health coaches and wellness training, life coaching… the list goes on! Many of these jobs that I just noted have their own special subsect of ABA, such as Organizational Behavior Management (OBM). 

What are some examples of jobs as a BCBA®?

As a BCBA, you may find yourself in a clinic working as a program manager, supervisor, or clinical director. In the school system, you could be overseeing a number of students who have been referred to ABA services. Check out our blog post on “A Day in the Life of a School Based BCBA” for more information. Additionally, you may find yourself working in the hospital setting, in a residential environment with children and adults, or maybe even working for yourself consulting across various clients and settings. 

How do I find these jobs as a BCBA®?

I have found that the key to working outside of the scope of autism is knowing how to search for what you want. Oftentimes, searching for “BCBA® jobs” or even “ABA” will only yield jobs working with children with autism. Instead, try searching, “behavior management”, or even find a company that you want to work for, and ask them if you can lend your services to them. Explain your level of expertise and market yourself accordingly. Remember, behavior analysts, are ethically bound to seek guidance when operating outside of their expertise. That being said, it is important to find quality supervision that matches your interests as you are becoming a BCBA®. See post on finding quality supervision here for reference. 

If there is something that you want to learn how to do, like applying the principles of ABA in an HR kind of situation, seek guidance for someone who has that experience in OBM.

The BACB has a list of jobs that behavior analysts can do on their website as a reference as well. Check it out! 

 

 

Cammie Morgan, MSC, BCBA, LBA (Hawaii), IBA

Cammie@ReadySetABA.com

A Day in the Life of a School Based BCBA®

A Day in the Life of a School Based BCBA®

First Caffeine, Then Analysis! 

As a school-based BCBA, my days begin similarly to a clinic-based Analyst; I wake up, brush my teeth, workout (occasionally), get dressed, load up on caffeine, and head to work. In my office, you’ll find my work computer locked in my desk with my scholar’s files. Inside the scholar, files are documents like their Individualized Education Plans (IEPs) and the referral information that I have received in order for me to begin services. In a school setting, there are a few steps that take place prior to obtaining a scholar on your caseload.

My experience thus far has been completing a few observations of the scholar prior to what is called a Student Focus Team (SFT) meeting. SFT meetings take place with the scholar’s IEP team. In this meeting, the team discusses the need for a Functional Behavior Assessment and me as the Analyst gives the go-ahead to conduct the assessment. After agreeing to conduct a Functional Behavior Assessment (FBA) in the SFT meeting, I have a set amount of time (a total of 45 days in my state) to complete the assessment and report its findings.

Where to Complete the FBA and What’s Next?

I complete each of my FBAs by observing the scholars across various times, settings, and teachers, all within the school setting. Some of my observation locations include the classroom, recess, lunchtime, and in other staff rooms during sessions like speech therapy. I, or my RBT, observes and takes narrative and structured Antecedent Behavior Consequence (ABC) data consistently for at least 5 days. I conduct a FAST interview with the teacher(s) and the parent(s). I then analyze the data by graphing the frequency of each antecedent, consequence, and targeted behavior.

After analyzing the data and studying the graphs, I write my report which includes my graphed data of each antecedent and consequence, a description of the hypothesized function(s) of the behaviors, some examples of environmental changes that I suggest, and a detailed description of my analysis of each of the targeted behaviors. I wrap up my report by recommending suggestions for the family and teacher(s) of the scholar. If the data provides evidence that the scholar could benefit from having a one on one RBT without impeding their learning, I suggest that. I also provide behavioral goal suggestions in my FBA. After the parents and teachers accept the recommendations in my FBA, I write the scholar a Behavior Intervention Plan (BIP).

Another meeting then will be scheduled where I present my BIP. Until the BIP is agreed upon by the IEP team, it is a working document, meaning that the IEP team in the meeting has the ability to ask me about changing and tweaking the BIP until it is agreed upon by the entire team. Once the BIP is agreed upon, I begin writing the scholar’s program goals. 

How Can I Be an RBT in a School Setting?

In supervising my RBTs, I stress to them the art of using least to most prompting with assisting the scholar with attending to the teacher and educational assistant and their instructions. This is one of the main differences that I have found from the clinical setting. In theory, my goal for the RBT during group instruction would be for the RBT to silently prompt the scholar, and provide the teacher with the reinforcer to give to the scholar immediately upon appropriately responding, all a while pairing with the scholar, and gaining instructional control during one on one time periods. Oftentimes I have found that teachers simply do not have the luxury of waiting out behaviors as we may in a clinical setting. They have more students to tend to and a school schedule to adhere to, so I also supervise the RBT on how to follow the BIP and intervene for behavior management when necessary. 

Behavior Goes Where the Reinforcement Flows

As a school-based BCBA, I consult with each of my teachers for a set amount of time per week as outlined in the scholar’s IEP. I love teacher consultations because this helps me to pair with the teacher, provide the teacher some insight on ABA and the specific methods that I am using with each scholar, and it gives me the ability to understand the teacher’s methods as well. Staff buy-in is everything in a school setting, and PAIRING IS KEY! It is very important to not come across as a know-it-all, arrogant, or as though you are telling the school staff what they are doing wrong. In order to have the most success with suggestions and intervention implementation, the school staff must feel supported by you.

One of my favorite things about being a school-based BCBA is having the ability to collaborate on a daily basis with the teachers and other school staff. We all may come from different disciplines, but with the primary focus being on the scholar, we all come together, kumbaya, and work to crush each goal one day at a time! The way I like to think of it is like this, the teacher states what the academic goal is, and as the Behavior Analyst, I can program for “how” the goal can be taught. Although the school setting is less controlled than the clinical setting, implementing the principles of ABA in this environment has given me the opportunity to apply my skill set to both my scholars and my professional peers, and that is the part that I wouldn’t change for the world. Come on over to the school side y’all! 

 

Like a behavioral cusp, it opens us up to a whole new world!

Cammie Morgan, MSC, BCBA, LBA (Hawaii), IBA
Cammie @ReadySetABA.com